Poetry and Story Bordello and ‘In the Praise of Ageing’

in praise of ageing

FinalDraft9thNovember2013 Podcast

Rachel Worsley brings us an interview with Patricia Edgar, the author of ‘In Praise of Ageing’.

We hear so much about the “ageing population”, so much that even the word “ageing” may induce collective groans from politicians and policy-makers who think that the aged will be placing unprecedented pressure on the health system. However, Patricia Edgar’s latest book, “In Praise of Ageing”, presents a feisty riposte to this alarmism, pointing out that our long life expectancy should be considered one of the great achievements of the modern world.

We also visit the Word Travels Festival where Rachel Worsley got a poetry lap dance as part of the Poetry & Story Bordello. Held inside the historical rooms of a 19th century mansion in The Rocks, poets and storytellers such as Ursula Rucker and Edwina Blush entertained audiences late into the night in a smorgasbord of live literary adventures and intimate unplugged shows.

Run, sweat, inspire: indigenous runners storm home in the New York Marathon

Run, sweat, inspire: indigenous runners storm in the New York Marathon

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Eleven indigenous runners from Australia have just crossed the finishing line at the 2013 New York Marathon has just been completed, and they couldn’t be happier from themselves.
Coming from diverse backgrounds all over the country, the eleven runners have often overcome personal obstacles and challenges to compete in the marathon. Set up over three years ago by former Olympian long-distance runner, Robert de Castella, it aimed to promote healthy lifestyles in indigenous committees. But it’s also become an inspiration to those who support the runners, such as their mentors. Photo credit: Indigenous Marathon Project (http://imp.org.au/)
Broadcast on The Wire on 4th November 2013
https://soundcloud.com/rachel-worsley/indigenous-project-marathon

City Centre Access Strategy

city centre access

City Centre Access Strategy

Photo: Derek Law/flickr

Bike riders, pedestrians and light rail advocates rejoice- Sydney will soon become a paradise for your traveling needs. This week, the NSW Government released the Sydney City Centre Access Strategy, which will map out how people will travel around the CBD in the next twenty years.

Key features of this plan will include light rail in the CBD, more connected cycleways and improved access for pedestrians.

But while the reception has been mostly positive, critics question the need to remove popular cycleways, such as the College Street cycleway, as well as the plan’s incompatibility with the WestConnex project which will be bringing more cars into the CBD at a time where fewer cars are needed.

Rachel Worsley reports.

The Mystery of the Missing Science Ministry

The Mystery of the Missing Science Ministry

When Tony Abbott announced his frontbench earlier this week, many were dismayed by the lack of women on the frontbench. But just as many were concerned about the lack of a Minister of Science, which had ceased to become its own portfolio since its creation in 1931.

Instead, the responsibility for science will be split between the new Minister for Industry, Ian Mcfarlane, and Education Minister, Christopher Pyne.

Some critics say that this shows the lack of importance that the new Abbott Government will put on science, and is seen as a retrograde step backwards for the 21st Century.

Rachel Worsley reports.

No More Smoko for NSW Prisoners

smoko pic

No More Smoko for NSW Prisoners

Authorities have banned smoking from bus stops, playgrounds, buildings and now NSW Prisons wants to ban it from jails. On Monday, the NSW Corrective Services Commissioner, Peter Severin, has called for a ban for smoking within 18 months.

He says banning the cigarette would prevent passive smoking effects on prison guards and other inmates.

But some advocacy groups have criticised this move, saying it is an unfair infringement on the rights of smokers.

Rachel Worsley reports.

No Journos Allowed!

TPP photo

No Journos Allowed!

Let’s call a public meeting, but not invite any journos.

Hang on – does that make it a public-private meeting?

Well that appeared to be the case earlier this week when the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade initially barred all journalists from attending a stakeholder meeting on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement in Sydney. DFAT allowed media workers back in eventually, but only as private citizens and under the condition of not reporting any content from the meeting.

As Rachel Worsley reports, media advocates claim this is suppression of information from the public, but others say it’s important to ensure that important trade information between countries doesn’t get compromised by unwanted public attention.

A Golden Eye for Docos

A Golden Eye for Docos

If you were going to shoot your very first documentary, would you self-fund a trip to the Middle East? What about entering a militarised conflict zone and risk being confronted by guns, protests and interrogations from Israeli police? 

Chantell Basiacik, together with crew members Alastair Wharton and Jack McAvoy, did. The final-yearmedia arts and production and international studies student was the director and producer of Not My Place, a 22-minute documentary exploring the lives of Israeli and Palestinian youths living amid the ongoing Middle East conflict. 

Published in November 2013 version of U:Magazine 

A Place to Call Home

A Place to Call Home

“The only thing I knew about Australia was Skippy the kangaroo,” reveals Michael Ascharsobi when first asked about the land he now calls home.

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology and Master of Science in Internetworking graduate now works at Google. He started at the company in 2011 as an apps strategist, before moving into operations managing workflow processes. It’s a far cry from Ahwaz, the small Iranian town that borders Iraq, from which he fled at age 16.

“I follow a religion, Sabian Mandaean, which in Iran is different from the mainstream,” says Ascharsobi. “So growing up was a little difficult because I had to keep my religion in hiding.” He even had to lie about his religion to enter high school and was never sure if his secret would be discovered. It was.

Published in October 2013 version of U:Magazine.